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Abstract
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Abstract number: 367

Session Type: ePosters

Session Title: ePosters

Authors(s): K. Stanoeva (1, 2, 3), R. Zonneveld (1, 4, 3), O. Van Den Berg (1, 3), D. Hoek-Van Deursen (1), F. Van Der Klis (1), E. Franz (1), I. Friesema (1), L. Kortbeek (1)

Authors Affiliations(s): (1) Center for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Netherlands, (2) European Public Health Microbiology Training Programme (EUPHEM), European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Sweden, (3) equal contribution, (4) Department of Medical Microbiology and Infection Prevention, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Academic Medical Center, Netherlands

Background:

Every 10 years a nationwide serosurvey, PIENTER, is conducted in the Netherlands, the most recent one  in 2016-2017. The prior two serosurveys estimated the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan with Felidae, incl. domestic cats, as definitive host.

Methods:

PIENTER-3 included a questionnaire and serum sampling among Dutch residents from all ages across the country. Samples were tested for the presence of IgG antibodies via an in-house ELISA assay. All statistical analyses were performed using R and SPSS software. A two-sided p-value of  ≤ 0.05  was considered statistically significant. 

Results:

A total of 6414 samples were tested (of which 55 were considered borderline with OD ratio close to the cut off and 33 excluded due to discrepancies between duplicates). The remaining 6326 samples were included in the analysis. The overall seroprevalence was 29.7% (95 CI 28.6-30.9%) with varying levels among regions (Figure 1) and age groups (Figure 2): 9.9% in 0-15 years old, 11.5% in 16-30 years old, 20.5% in 31-45 years old, 38% in 45-60 years old, 58% in 61-75 years old and 76.4% in 76-90 years old. The seroprevalence was similar in both genders: 30.9% in male and 28.9% in female participants.

Conclusions:

The data showed a higher presence of Toxoplasma antibodies with increasing age and no significant difference between genders, similarly to the findings in the prior two serosurveys. However, the overall seroprevalence was slightly higher than in 2006-2007 (26%), it was especially higher in the higher age groups  and did not follow the decreasing trend that has been observed since 1995-1996 (40.5%) (Figure 2). Other European seroprevalence studies reported similar decreases in recent years, leading to the question of specifics in the Dutch setting. Further analysis on the risk factors is needed to explain the Toxoplasma seroprevalence in 2016-2017. Public health prevention measures may need to be taken in order to control the protozoan spread among the Dutch population.

Keyword(s): Toxoplasma, seroprevalence, Netherlands


COI Other: European Public Health Microbiology Training Programme (EUPHEM) fellowship, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) to K.S.
Abstract number: 367

Session Type: ePosters

Session Title: ePosters

Authors(s): K. Stanoeva (1, 2, 3), R. Zonneveld (1, 4, 3), O. Van Den Berg (1, 3), D. Hoek-Van Deursen (1), F. Van Der Klis (1), E. Franz (1), I. Friesema (1), L. Kortbeek (1)

Authors Affiliations(s): (1) Center for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Netherlands, (2) European Public Health Microbiology Training Programme (EUPHEM), European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Sweden, (3) equal contribution, (4) Department of Medical Microbiology and Infection Prevention, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Academic Medical Center, Netherlands

Background:

Every 10 years a nationwide serosurvey, PIENTER, is conducted in the Netherlands, the most recent one  in 2016-2017. The prior two serosurveys estimated the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan with Felidae, incl. domestic cats, as definitive host.

Methods:

PIENTER-3 included a questionnaire and serum sampling among Dutch residents from all ages across the country. Samples were tested for the presence of IgG antibodies via an in-house ELISA assay. All statistical analyses were performed using R and SPSS software. A two-sided p-value of  ≤ 0.05  was considered statistically significant. 

Results:

A total of 6414 samples were tested (of which 55 were considered borderline with OD ratio close to the cut off and 33 excluded due to discrepancies between duplicates). The remaining 6326 samples were included in the analysis. The overall seroprevalence was 29.7% (95 CI 28.6-30.9%) with varying levels among regions (Figure 1) and age groups (Figure 2): 9.9% in 0-15 years old, 11.5% in 16-30 years old, 20.5% in 31-45 years old, 38% in 45-60 years old, 58% in 61-75 years old and 76.4% in 76-90 years old. The seroprevalence was similar in both genders: 30.9% in male and 28.9% in female participants.

Conclusions:

The data showed a higher presence of Toxoplasma antibodies with increasing age and no significant difference between genders, similarly to the findings in the prior two serosurveys. However, the overall seroprevalence was slightly higher than in 2006-2007 (26%), it was especially higher in the higher age groups  and did not follow the decreasing trend that has been observed since 1995-1996 (40.5%) (Figure 2). Other European seroprevalence studies reported similar decreases in recent years, leading to the question of specifics in the Dutch setting. Further analysis on the risk factors is needed to explain the Toxoplasma seroprevalence in 2016-2017. Public health prevention measures may need to be taken in order to control the protozoan spread among the Dutch population.

Keyword(s): Toxoplasma, seroprevalence, Netherlands


COI Other: European Public Health Microbiology Training Programme (EUPHEM) fellowship, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) to K.S.
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